bogleech:

I barely know how to accurately describe this but when I was younger and I’d get an intense fever (which was like once every 5-8 weeks) I’d sometimes enter a hallucinatory state where my mind interpreted words and thoughts as puffy, wet, doughy objects, like giant swollen pasta shapes, which I…

I know exactly what you mean about words being doughy, same thing happens when I have high fevers. When I was around 8-10 any time I had a fever I’d always shut my eyes and suddenly feel and see myself crawling through an air duct knowing that something was behind me. I’d keep crawling and crawling down a seemingly endless corridor and every few seconds my vision would just focus on a giant digital alarm clock that was counting down from 10:00 one second at a time. Each time the hour decreased whatever was chasing me would get closer and start making sounds until by the time I got to 1 it was basically holding my legs in its teeth/claws/whatever and eating me. The first time it happened I was violently thrashing and screaming in my bed for my mom (she was a nurse at the time) to get bandages and “wrap my pieces back on.”

Fever dreams are weird as hell.

elijahshandseight:

A depiction of Yutyrannus made after its discover, with a woodpecker-like colour scheme. Yes, I like black and white dinosaurs. Yes, I like them a lot.

Yutyrannus (meaning “feathered tyrant”) is a genus of tyrannosauroid dinosaurs which contains a single species, Yutyrannus huali. This species lived during the early Cretaceous period in what is now northeastern China. Three fossils of Y. huali - all found in the rock beds of Liaoning Province - are currently the largest known dinosaur specimens that preserve direct evidence of feathers.

Yutyrannus, the Featherd Tyrant, 2012.

Coloured with Tria Markers. Based on woodpeckers.

References: http://www.nrc.nl/wetenschap/files/2012/04/yutyrannus_schedel.jpg

Link: http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/Yutyrannus-the-Feathered-Tyrant-294238131

Lineart: http://smnt2000.deviantart.com/art/Yutyrannus-Lineart-294263233

(via paleobiology)

jurassiraptor:

As Day 2 of San Diego Comic Con 2014 wraps up, some more resourceful fans have claimed exclusive Jurassic World posters and a classic-style Jurassic Park Jeep was also spotted!

There will be one more opportunity tomorrow for Comic Con attendees to find the Jurassic World truck in San Diego and claim a poster.

Following that, there will be online giveaways of the variant posters, so those of us unable to attend Comic Con will still have a chance to win one. Recipients will be determined through daily challenges posted on the official Jurassic World social channels.

Tomorrow is also the day of Legendary Entertainment’s panel at Comic Con, and there are rumblings that a Jurassic World teaser may be shown… Stay tuned!

paleobiology:

Why are people such big babies about feathered dinosaurs? Of course a feathered Tyrannosaurus is still scary. Like bears are fluffy as all heck and they’re sure terrifying

archosaurophilia:

Desmatosuchus, one of that mighty lineage of armor-backed pseudosuchians, the aetosaurs (or as Darren Naish once aptly termed them, the armadillodiles). It joins its distant relatives ShuvosaurusEffigia, and Simosuchus in defying the carnivory we may come to expect from croc-line archosaurs. The shovel-like snout and peg-shaped teeth of aetosaurs would seem to pin them as herbivores.

All the same, it has been postulated before that these were instead adaptations for insectivory, and an abstract has been around since 1995 toting around the supposed discovery of a carnivorous aetosaur. Personally I wouldn’t be surprised if they were something more akin to boar-like, omnivorous scavengers of Triassic forests.

Desmatosuchus was among the larger members of the family, spanning about 5 meters (16 feet) in length. It’s known from the Late Triassic of Texas.

dendroica:

It’s not just extinction: meet defaunation

Get ready to learn a new word: defaunation. Fauna is the total collection of animals—both in terms of species diversity and abundance—in a given area. So, defaunation, much like deforestation, means the loss of animals in all its myriad forms, including extinction, extirpation, or population declines. A special issue in Science today shines light on this little-discussed global trend and highlights how it’s impacting human society.

"Though for emotional or aesthetic reasons we may lament the loss of large charismatic species, such as tigers, rhinos, and pandas, we now know that loss of animals, from the largest elephant to the smallest beetle, will also fundamentally alter the form and function of the ecosystems upon which we all depend," writes Sacha Vignieri, an Associate Editor with Science in an introduction on the issue.

Starting with the bigger—more well-known—species, vertebrate populations on average have declined by over a quarter in the last forty years, according to a review paper in the issue. Such numbers are borne out by a lot of anecdotal reporting of the “empty forest” syndrome, where scientists are noticing more-and-more seemingly intact forests and other habitats that have been stripped of their medium to large vertebrates.

Meanwhile at least 322 vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, a trend in human-caused extinctions that likely began during the Pleistocene. Many additional vertebrates remain unrecorded for decades and could be extinct.

But “fauna” also extends to invertebrates, which really comprise the vast bulk of the world’s animals. Most of these animals—which includes everything from insects to mollusks and jellyfish to spiders—have been far less studied than the world’s vertebrates and so much less is known about how imperiled they are and their population trends. Still, the data that we do have is not good.

A global review of 452 invertebrates find that these populations have fallen by 45 percent over the last 40 years. The best data is in the Lepidoptera family—moths and butterflies—which shows a drop in abundance of about 35 percent.

(Read more at Mongabay.com)

(via crotalinae)

elegantbuffalo:

"The snake reportedly fought the croc for five hours in Lake Moondarra. Winning the fight, the python constricted its prey to death. The estimated 10-foot snake then dragged the 3-foot croc ashore and proceeded to swallow it whole in front of a group of onlookers."
Whole story here.
!!! awesome
elegantbuffalo:

"The snake reportedly fought the croc for five hours in Lake Moondarra. Winning the fight, the python constricted its prey to death. The estimated 10-foot snake then dragged the 3-foot croc ashore and proceeded to swallow it whole in front of a group of onlookers."
Whole story here.
!!! awesome

elegantbuffalo:

"The snake reportedly fought the croc for five hours in Lake Moondarra. Winning the fight, the python constricted its prey to death. The estimated 10-foot snake then dragged the 3-foot croc ashore and proceeded to swallow it whole in front of a group of onlookers."

Whole story here.

!!! awesome

(via notadeinonychus)

archosaurophilia:

Aussie spinosaurid by Hyrotrioskjan

And again: Austalia is always good for a surprise. I’m very curious what the rock of this continent will release next.

Like the most australian dinosaurs, we have just a few bones of this specimen. But it’s enough to show us that the distribution of this awesome family was larger as we thought.

Here you the young, baryonychid with his, maybe last, meal: a baby Koolasuchus” - Hyrotrioskjan (AKA Joschua Knüppe)

legendarycomics:

Godzilla: Awakening motion comic as seen at the Legendary Booth at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. Out now!
legendarycomics:

Godzilla: Awakening motion comic as seen at the Legendary Booth at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. Out now!
legendarycomics:

Godzilla: Awakening motion comic as seen at the Legendary Booth at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. Out now!
legendarycomics:

Godzilla: Awakening motion comic as seen at the Legendary Booth at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. Out now!
legendarycomics:

Godzilla: Awakening motion comic as seen at the Legendary Booth at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. Out now!

legendarycomics:

Godzilla: Awakening motion comic as seen at the Legendary Booth at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. Out now!

(via kaijusaurus)